RSS

Photo Op

vintage cameraA stroll along the beach resulted in this picture. I found it interesting to note all the textures, patterns, and materials present: the weathered and whorled wood; the rusting iron; the rocks; the sand, all being impacted on by nature and all showing different results. Your blog is most attractive for those of us who are into the boating lifestyle and I would assume, many who just happen to find the site. I am sure all these pictures reach across the interest level as well. Your featured image here–the vintage camera–is also quite creative. Thanks for your years of outstanding writing with the magazines and now, for this most informative site.
-A. Bartley, Seattle, WA

IMG_0062

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 25, 2014 in Photo Op

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Boat US Report

BoatuslogoIs it Drowning, or Electric Shock Drowning?

What You Need to Know to Help Save a Life

No matter how you participate in the boating lifestyle, whenever you begin a new day on the water there is always the chance of something going wrong. My industry friend, Boat US’s Scott Croft, who has sent along relevant and interesting postings in the past, has forwarded this one to me in order that I might share it with you. It is a timely read and one that all of us should pay attention to. Be safe. -Capt. Ken

While standing at the end of your boat dock, you see a person struggling in the water. Do you recognize that the person is drowning, or is something else going on? And what should you do? Doing the right thing could help save someone else’s life, and might keep you from losing yours.

Electric Shock Drowning (ESD) occurs when faulty dock or boat wiring causes electricity (alternating current or “AC” power) to enter fresh water and pass through a swimmer. The swimmer does not need to be touching the bottom, a boat or dock structure, and even minute amounts of electricity can be incapacitating. As more light is shed on this danger, it is likely that some ESD fatalities have been misidentified as drowning, preventing awareness of this summertime boating danger. The risk of ESD is greatest in fresh or brackish waters, so some areas such as estuaries or rivers may only be in the danger zone after heavy rains. In saltwater, electric current takes the path of least resistance, bypassing swimmers.

Unlike a drowning swimmer, who typically can’t yell out for help because their mouth is mostly underwater, an ESD victim is often confused about what is happening to them, may be able to shout, and will feel numbness, tingling, pain and paralysis. A drowning victim often looks “playful”, moving their arms in a ladder climbing fashion, while an Electric Shock Drowning victim looks “distressed” and may simply roll on their back – if wearing a life jacket – or roll face down into the water, totally unresponsive.

A typical drowning can take as up to a minute for an adult or just 20 seconds for a child, with the victim’s arms moving in a climbing-a-ladder type motion, taking quick gulps of air, with the mouth below the water much of the time. ESD victims can be instantly paralyzed and not move at all.

Innocent enough? But is there electricity in the water? Boaters and parents need to know about Electric Shock Drowning, and what to do to save a life. Photo Credit: Brian Fitzgerald

Innocent enough? But is there electricity in the water? Boaters and parents need to know about Electric Shock Drowning, and what to do to save a life. Photo Credit: Brian Fitzgerald

So what do you need to do for both cases? Don’t jump in the water – call 911, and follow the “Reach, throw, row, but don’t go” mantra. Only a professional lifeguard has the training to handle a drowning victim. Far too often, news reports show well-intentioned rescuers increase the fatality count. If the problem is ESD – which may not be abundantly clear – going in the water could kill you.

Whether the person is drowning or suffering from ESD, use an oar, boat hook or throw a floatation device, or get into a boat and try to reach the person from there. Do everything you can – tossing a line, throwing life jackets, grabbing a nearby dinghy – but don’t go into the water yourself. Once you have retrieved the person, start CPR if there is no pulse. Automated Electrical Defibrillators are also becoming more common – just make sure the victim’s chest is dry.

For more information, parents, dock owners, boaters, and marina and boat club operators can go to the Boat Owners Association of The United States’ Electric Shock Drowning Resource Center at www.BoatUS.com/seaworthy/ESD.

###

About BoatUS:

Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) is the nation’s leading advocate for recreational boaters providing its over half-million members with government representation, services such as 24-hour dispatch, on water boat towing as well as roadside assistance for boat trailers and tow vehicles, feature-packed boat insurance programs, money-saving benefits including marina and service discounts, and vital information that improves recreational boating. Its member-funded BoatUS Foundation is a national leader promoting safe, clean and responsible boating and offers a range of boating safety courses – including 33 free state courses – that can be found at BoatUS.org/courses.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 24, 2014 in BoatUS Report

 

Tags: , , ,

Equipment

boat63 AMP PRODUCTS DELIVER POWER IN INTERNATIONAL WATERS

For those of us who call stateside home, traveling to foreign ports can often present a minefield of problems one just has to navigate through. Besides the usual waiting time for customs clearance, and the sometimes grueling and seemingly never ending inspection process, visiting boaters trying to plug their boats into dockside power can leave one no other choice but to run the on board generator to keep things going.

Now U.S. boats destined for international waters can rely on safe ship-to-shore power options from Hubbell and its 63 amp, 230 volt products. This is the only CE-certified electrical shore power system dedicated to overseas use.

hub21816-x7hWhile featuring traditional marine styling, Hubbell’s 63 amp products are intended for use with 50 cycle systems only, and not interchangeable with US systems. Like other Hubbell international shore power offerings, this configuration utilizes standard NEMA designs not normally found in the marine market.

Constructed of 316 stainless steel, the 63 amp products resemble ordinary shore power fixtures. Built to Hubbell’s high quality standards, they offer a watertight seal. A nickel-plated rear enclosure and contact blades ensure corrosion resistance. The unique thermoset interior resists arcing and heat build-up 400% more than typical interiors. Pressure-screw terminals deliver secure terminations.

Hubbell also offers 100, 125 and 200 amp pin and sleeve shore power systems, including back boxes and feed-through boxes for inlets and receptacles.

Contact Hubbell Marine Electrical Products, 40 Waterview Dr., Shelton, CT 06484.
475-882-4838; Fax: 203-783-9195. www.hubbell-marine.com

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 23, 2014 in Equipment

 

Tags: , , ,

Photo Op

vintage cameraMy friends and I have been following your postings and are really enjoying all the personal photographs that are being sent in. I thought you might find this one interesting: We are regulars in the waters off of Carbon Beach in Malibu and with the wind and surf down a bit, decided to take a break. I snapped off this shot and hope you and everybody else checking in, likes it. -J. ‘Gus’ Medwick, Carbon Beach, Malibu, CA

DSC_2286

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 19, 2014 in Photo Op

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Maintenance

tool_box_250x251FENDER ATTACHMENT STRETCHES FOR BEST PROTECTION

A simple device can help prevent those unwanted moments when the possibility of damage is present during docking maneuvers.

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

Here at the Boat & Yacht Report, we are always on the lookout for products that can enhance our boating experiences. I came across this one from Davis Instruments and thought it might be of interest to some of you who want an extra edge on protecting your boat’s hull and rails while leaving and getting into the dock.

There are various rope, strap and clip fender attachment products on the market, but none provide the stretch needed when a fender gets caught between the dock and boat while the boat is still moving forward. The Shockles FenderFriend from Davis Instruments is the first and only fender whip with a built-in shock absorber to receive the impact generated by fenders rubbing against the hull, dock or piling.

dav21842-x3hThe stretch protects both the boat and fender from damage. Keeping stanchions, rails and cleats from bending under pull, FenderFriend helps keep fenders in place while docking, or during surges and wakes when the boat is unattended

With no knots to tie, FenderFriend is incredibly easy to use. The quick-release NEXUS® NYLON buckle makes deploying and stowing fenders quick and easy. FenderFriend can be clipped to anything, including cleats, lifelines, stanchions and handrails.

It can be set to length for a standard docking situation and anyone can easily deploy the fenders. The adjustable buckle allows FenderFriend to be set to the correct length. Owners simply tighten or loosen the strap to adjust the fender height.

FenderFriend is available in two styles. Both the Twin-Eye and Center-Tube versions allow the strap length to be adjusted from 16-72″. Its tubular nylon webbing protects the elastomer from UV rays and abrasion. FenderFriend provides 12″ of shock-absorbing stretch.

Contact Davis Instruments, 3465 Diablo Ave., Hayward, CA  94545. 510-732-9229;
Fax: 510-732-9188. info@davisnet.comwww.davisnet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 19, 2014 in Maintenance

 

Tags: ,

Yacht Spotting and New Launches

_Galilei_and_Doge_of_Venice

Jarrett Bay Boatworks Delivers on a Tall Order

43 Hardtop Express Raises the Roof on Custom Sportfish Design

Jarrett Bay 43 HTX

Over the years, Randy Ramsey and his crew at Jarrett Bay Boatworks has consistently pushed the envelope in custom sportfish design with boats that are not only beautiful to look at but fulfill all the requirements of a horizon-chasing, blue water tournament boat.

Jarrett Bay Boatworks recently delivered custom hull # 53, a 43’ Hardtop Express headed to bring a little Carolina Flare® to the Northeast Canyons. After compiling an impressive boat ownership resume of production and custom craft up to 80’, the owner of Jarrett Bay’s newest launch “Gregarious” brought an extensive custom wish list to the company’s designers and craftsmen. Always up for a unique challenge Jarrett Bay accommodated the owner’s towering height by elevating the hardtop to provide a comfortable head clearance when he is standing at the interior helm station. Interior arrangements were also elongated for added comfort in the cabin.

cockpit controlWith an intent focus on the business-end of this Jarrett Bay, the owner & captain’s cockpit order definitely did not fall short on any detail. Ensuring access to the twin 600hp Cummins QSC motors and Zeus pod drives did not encroach on deck space, the 43HTX’s hydraulic cockpit decklift delivers in both form & state-of-the-art function. Making the most out of all spaces, the mezzanine not only serves as a comfort station complete with an ice maker and drink coolers, it also provides bait storage and functions as an aft helm station with pod joystick controls in a recessed compartment. Also serving double-duty is the stern fishbox that doubles as a live well. Keeping the aft deck space clear of clutter from head to toe, the electric teaser reels are flush mounted into the cabin overhang, and a low-footprint Release Marine Battle Saddle perfectly complements Jarrett Bay’s finely crafted teak cockpit accents, as well as the custom metal, CNC-cut Jarrett Bay logo drain covers.

hydraulic cockpitRaising the cockpit floor, an Alexseal® premium yacht finish adorns one of the most accessible engine room spaces for a boat of this size. In addition to the power package & pod drive system, an ISO boost unit, watermaker and Cummins Onan Generator are all positioned for convenient reach.

Look down after dusk, and you’ll find your own aquarium forming around custom underwater transom LED lights. Walk forward safely using a hidden finger rail on the cabin sides to access the custom anchor pulpit and windlass, and look back at the wide-view wrap-around windows with wipers for maximum visibility in unfavorable conditions. Look up to find FLIR technology, custom LED tower lights, pod joystick controls, teaser reel remote, and actuated storage drawers all conveniently accessible in the buggy top.

salon/helmWalking in the cabin door, you step into a dual-functioning helm and saloon space wrapped in the richness of custom book-matched cherry veneer and trim accents. Notably used by Cadillac as their interior accent wood for its perfect balance of luxury and durability, Sapele is matched with maple on the floors with a satin finish throughout. Sapele lumber runners are also used in the headliner to provide a luxurious accent, and to help make the cabin space feel even larger. Two Stidd helm chairs with a matching electronics dash wrap are the foundation for the interior driving station with pod joystick controls. Guests can keep the captain company in a Jarrett Bay signature bucket seat and sofa with dry storage underneath; or lend a hand in the well-appointed galley with hidden Sub-Zero refrigerator/freezer units, a hidden microwave and maximized storage space and cabinetry.

hand-carved sinkBuilt with canyon overnighters and extended Caribbean cruising in mind, the Jarrett Bay 43 HTX comfortably sleeps four in a forward queen berth stateroom and a side-by-side bunk room beneath saloon. This unique bunk room bonus space is afforded due to the smaller footprint needed for the engine room thanks to the compact pod drives. The queen bed lifts for custom rod storage, and hanging and storage lockers are found centrally and on the outboard hull sides.

Jarrett Bay 43 HTXKeeping things custom all the way into the head, here you will find a hand-carved, high-gloss Sapele sink and matching counter top, custom wallpaper and a teak trimmed, seamless glass shower entrance.

Wrapping it all up in a shiny Alexseal Kingston Grey coated hull, a Josh Everett Nautical Designs hand-painted transom, and topped off with a custom buggy top, the “Gregarious” is ready to share the quality, passion and dedication of Jarrett Bay’s custom Carolina construction with all she may encounter.

http://www.jarrettbay.com

43’ Jarrett Bay Boatworks Hardtop Express Hull 53 Specifications

Jarrett Bay 43 HTX
Length Overall:
43’

Beam:
14’ 6”

Draft:
3’ 10”

Freshwater Capacity:
100 gal.

Fuel Capacity:
620 gal.

Weight Displacement (fully loaded):
35,750 lbs.

Dry Weight:
29,770 lbs.

Power:
600hp Cummins QSC8.3
with Zeus Pod Drives

Cruise Speed:
31.8 kts.

Cruise Fuel Burn:
44.6 gph

Top Speed:
36.8 kts.

 
 

Tags: , , , ,

Photo Op

vintage cameraChoices. Sometimes easier to make than others. Take my dilemma with this situation. Should I surf or swim? For me, either way, I win. Keep up the excellent work here. I am enjoying your postings and look forward to each one. No choice. I will be back. Good onya mate! -K. Morse, Bondi Beach, Australia

 

 

 

DSC_2288

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 19, 2014 in Photo Op

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.