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DSC04108TORQEEDO POWERS THE BBC ON THE AMAZON RIVER

Torqeedo, leader in the growing electric marine propulsion market, worked with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) to power its natural history documentary team’s boat on the Amazon River. There, they filmed pink river dolphins in the water and jaguars on shore, for its latest “Planet Earth II” series. It will be presented by Sir David Attenborough on BBC One, beginning November 2016, and on BBC America, starting January 28, 2017.

While preparing to start filming, the BBC contacted Torqeedo. Its primary concern was the need to preserve the environment, without disturbing the animals with noisy motors or polluting their habitats. Torqeedo recommended its popular low-maintenance, low-voltage Travel 1003 model with integrated high-performance lithium batteries and a solar panel for charging in the field.

“We were keen to get as close to the animals in their natural environment as possible, but their wellbeing and safety will always come first,” said Tom Crowley, part of the BBC Natural History Unit for the “Planet Earth II” series. “Using Torqeedo’s electric motors ensures we can protect and preserve their habitat, whilst getting closer than we’ve been before. The Travel 1003 model was so easy and simple to use, and allowed us to concentrate on the most important factor: filming these gorgeous creatures.”

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Torqeedo’s environmentally friendly outboards are easy to lift, stow and carry, almost silent in use and extremely inexpensive to run. They achieve the same power as a gasoline-powered engine, without the emissions and risk of leaking fuel. With vastly improved battery technologies, the cleanliness, reliability and low maintenance ownership experience of a modern electric engine is now highly appealing to a wide range of boat owners.

Contact Torqeedo Inc., 171 Erick Street Unit A-1, Crystal Lake, IL 60014. 815-444-8806; Fax: 815-444-8807.usa@torqeedo.com; http://www.torqeedo.com

GREEN DOCK is dedicated to supplying a forum to discuss important issues, products, and trends that can better help all of us protect the environment. Your thoughts, ideas, opinions, and desire to make a change is most welcome. Please contact us by using the COMMENT tab at the lower right hand corner of this page.

 
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Posted by on November 30, 2016 in Green Dock

 

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Centek BilgeKleen™ Filter System
Prevents Overboard Discharge of Oil & Fuel

An easy to install filter will help keep pollutants from being transferred to the water.

Continuing in our endeavors to bring you information from those companies who focus on issues concerning products and systems than can and will impact the environment, Centek Industries has consistently been in the forefront of the movement towards helping the boating industry deal with these issues.

The Centek Industries BilgeKleen™ filter system automatically removes oil, gas, diesel fuel and other hydrocarbon pollutants from bilge water before it is discharged overboard.

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The patented system uses a filtering medium that binds to hydrocarbons and allows water to pass through freely. As a result, over 99.9% of the hydrocarbon pollutants are captured, with no increase in pressure to the bilge pump. Installs easily to the bilge pump discharge line and includes an absorbent pad for the bilge sump area to capture harmful contaminants where they form.

A variety of BilgeKleen system sizes are available from Centek’s worldwide dealer network to fit almost any bilge space or application, from runabouts to megayachts and commercial vessels.

More info: Centek Industries web site or call 1+229.228.7653.

Centek Industries – 116 Plantation Oak Drive – Thomasville, GA 31792 USA

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2016 in Green Dock

 

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TORQEEDO INTRODUCES 20-hp EQUIVALENT ELECTRIC OUTBOARD

Building on its long history of producing the most efficient electric outboards in the world, Torqeedo has introduced a new flagship model for its low-voltage Cruise line, the Cruise 10.0. This 20 horsepower-equivalent, emission-free outboard can plane light boats at speeds up to 28 mph and moves displacement hulls from 3 to 10 tons at up to 9 mph.

“Torqeedo’s range of products encompasses systems from 1 hp all the way up to the 80 hp high-voltage Deep Blue. The Cruise 10.0 provides a clean, green and quiet alternative for commercial and recreational users who prefer the simplicity and easy handling of a low-voltage system, but require more speed, thrust and power than previously available,” said Steve Trkla, president and general manager of Torqeedo, Inc.

The Cruise 10.0’s electronically commutated, brushless DC motor and carefully optimized propeller provides up to 12 kW at peak input and 10 kW continuous power. The 48V outboard delivers impressive performance while maintaining the simple handling and installation of a low-voltage system. It comes standard with an integrated electric tilt, easily mounts to the vessel’s remote steering and is available in three shaft lengths.

tqo22653hThe industry-leading 5-hp and 8-hp equivalent Cruise motors were redesigned in 2015 to include a rugged aluminum lower unit, full waterproofing to IP67 and corrosion protection. These features are carried forward into the Cruise 10.0, which also provides all of the high-tech user experiences the series is known for, including a full display showing battery status, GPS-calculated range and speed, and up-to-the-minute data regarding remaining runtime.

For 10 years, Torqeedo has led the way in marine lithium battery development. The Power 26-104 is the end result, and a perfect match for the Cruise series. Highly reliable and safe, these 25.9V power packs replace two 12V lead gel or AGM batteries, saving up to 70% of the space and weight. The Power 26-104 stores significantly more energy than other batteries and performs well under the high loads drawn by the Cruise 10.0.

The Cruise 10.0 is compatible with Torqeedo’s smartphone app, TorqTrac, allowing users to view all motor, GPS and mapping data in real time and in full color. A tiller-steered version is expected for 2017.

Contact Torqeedo Inc., 171 Erick Street Unit A-1, Crystal Lake, IL 60014. 815-444-8806; Fax: 815-444-8807. usa@torqeedo.com www.torqeedo.com.

  GREEN DOCK is dedicated to supplying a forum to discuss important issues, products, and trends that can better help all of us protect the environment. Your thoughts, ideas, opinions, and desire to make a change is most welcome. Please contact us by using the COMMENT tab at the lower right hand corner of this page.

 

 
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Posted by on November 25, 2015 in Green Dock

 

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SOLAR-ELECTRIC WORKBOAT COMPLETES HISTORIC CARGO RUN

For those of you who regularly check in with our GREEN DOCK postings–and I thank you for that–here’s one from trend-setting TORQEEDO, the same folks who have brought you their totally eco-friendly electric outboards. Sustainability and new energy sources are the future and for those of us who have already gotten aboard, there is plenty of room for more.

Thanks for caring. -Capt. Ken

Proving that solar propulsion is not only environmentally and budget-friendly, but feasible, a 39′ vessel, Solar Sal, recently completed the final leg of its maiden cargo run, carrying recycled cardboard along the Erie Canal without using a single drop of fossil fuel. Whether plug-in, hybrid or solar charged, more and more workboats are choosing Torqeedo electric propulsion due to its power, efficiency at moving heavy loads and cost savings.

Proving that solar propulsion is not only environmentally and budget-friendly, but feasible, a 39' vessel, Solar Sal, recently completed the final leg of its maiden cargo run, carrying recycled cardboard along the Erie Canal without using a single drop of fossil fuel. Whether plug-in, hybrid or solar charged, more and more workboats are choosing Torqeedo electric propulsion due to its power, efficiency at moving heavy loads and cost savings.

Proving that solar propulsion is not only environmentally and budget-friendly, but feasible, a 39′ vessel, Solar Sal, recently completed the final leg of its maiden cargo run, carrying recycled cardboard along the Erie Canal without using a single drop of fossil fuel. Whether plug-in, hybrid or solar charged, more and more workboats are choosing Torqeedo electric propulsion due to its power, efficiency at moving heavy loads and cost savings.

Solar Sal traversed 72 locks and traveled a total of 650 miles across the state of New York, delivering four tons of cargo from Lockport to a paper mill in Mechanicville on its history-making journey. The vessel runs 8.3 mph on twin Torqeedo Cruise 4.0 electric motors. Providing the equivalent thrust of two 9.9 horsepower combustion engines, these powerful, emission-free electric motors run on sunlight.

When Solar Sal’s builder, David Borton, decided to build a useful and practical solar electric boat, he relied on his background as an adjunct associate professor of mechanical engineering to design a 40′ wooden, strip-built hull with maximum surface area for solar collection. It can be fitted as a 12-ton cargo ship, dayliner tourist vessel or cabin cruiser, all using nothing but free, clean solar fuel.

“The best part of these motors is their efficiency. That includes the electronic control, good motor, planetary gear reduction and efficient, slow, large propeller,” said Borton.

Solar Sal can motor all day in daylight and up to 50 miles after sunset on stored battery power. It’s fitted with 5 kW of solar panels, serving two battery banks. One powers a bank of Torqeedo’s Power 26-104 lithium batteries, the other powers conventional lead-acid batteries. Borton hopes the side-by-side comparisons of the storage technologies will provide some interesting data in the future.

Christened Solar Sal, this craft is named for the famous song, Fifteen Miles on the Erie Canal. The song memorializes Sal, one of the mules that towed the barges that brought economic prosperity to New York in the mid- to late-1800s.

The vessel will be visiting local festivals and alternative energy conferences all through the year. Borton also has a personal target of building 10 solar electric boats a year.

Contact Torqeedo Inc., 171 Erick Street Unit A-1, Crystal Lake, IL 60014. 815-444-8806; Fax: 815-444-8807. usa@torqeedo.com; www.torqeedo.com

  GREEN DOCK is dedicated to supplying a forum to discuss important issues, products, and trends that can better help all of us protect the environment. Your thoughts, ideas, opinions, and desire to make a change is most welcome. Please contact us by using the COMMENT tab at the lower right hand corner of this page.

 
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Posted by on October 29, 2015 in Green Dock

 

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SPILL PREVENTION

A simple-to-use product can help prevent fuel spills.

New Clean Way Fuel Fill From Scandvik

Because we are always on the lookout for anything that can help us protect our watery environment, this posting of GREEN DOCK offers something we feel can help prevent fuel spills.

The new Clean Way Fuel Fill™ from Scandvik Marine is a unique, baffled device works with any fuel nozzle. Just insert a Clean Way into a gas or diesel deck fill and then the fuel nozzle. Click here or on the image at right to watch the how-to-video.

Manufactured from a clear, chemical-resistant, heavy-duty composite, each Clean Way Fuel Fill comes with an assortment of adaptors to fit any deck fill plate and any fuel nozzle size. Click here to find a distributor or retailer near you – worldwide.

For more information about the new Clean Way Fuel Fill and other products from Scandvik, visit www.scandvik.com, call 1+800.535.6009 (toll free in the US) or 1+772.567.2877.

Scandvik Marine – 423 4th Place S.W. – Vero Beach, FL 32962 USA

 GREEN DOCK is dedicated to supplying a forum to discuss important issues, products, and trends that can better help all of us protect the environment. Your thoughts, ideas, opinions, and desire to make a change is most welcome. Please contact us by using the COMMENT tab at the lower right hand corner of this page.

 
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Posted by on July 13, 2015 in Green Dock

 

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HERE COMES THE SUN

SOLAR ELECTRIC KAYAK TO MAKE NEARLY 2,000 MILE JOURNEY

Raphaël Domjan has an ambitious plan. This summer, the eco-adventurer intends to travel the Northwest Passage along the northern coast of North America from the Pacific to the Atlantic with an electric kayak, propelled by an Ultralight 403 from Torqeedo.

Domjan hit the international headlines back in May 2012. The Swiss engineer circumnavigated the earth for the first time in a solar-propelled catamaran, Planet Solar. His latest goal is to master the Northwest Passage. Domjan, who will be accompanied by the kayak-adventurer Anne Quéméré, faces a journey of more than 1,800 miles. Embarking in June 2015, it will be the first solar expedition through the legendary Northwest Passage. The 43-year-old’s expedition, SolarArcticPassage, will take the route discovered by Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen in 1895. The goal is 100 kilometers, about 63 miles, a day.

Raphaël Domjan and the Ultralight 403 from Torqeedo he will use on this amazing trip.

Raphaël Domjan and the Ultralight 403 from Torqeedo he will use on this amazing trip.

Sunlight is less intense in the Arctic than at any other place on earth. But that is exactly why Domjan will conduct the expedition; to demonstrate that solar electric-powered mobility is possible anywhere on earth. Despite the difficulties, the Arctic offers one important advantage – during the summer the Arctic Circle remains light for over 20 hours a day. The solar energy gained from the small surface of the kayak nevertheless remains extremely precious.

That is why Domjan has chosen the lightweight and highly efficient Ultralight 403 drive system from Starnberg’s high-tech manufacturer Torqeedo. Weighing just 16 pounds, including the battery, the Ultralight is the world’s lightest outboard in serial production. In addition, it converts limited energy supply into propulsive power extremely efficiently. The photovoltaic modules mounted on the kayak feed the Ultralight’s lithium batteries which, in turn, supply the motor with its energy.

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The starting point for the solar expedition is the small Canadian settlement of Tuktoyaktuk. Even in the summer months, temperatures struggle to reach the freezing point and are accompanied by rain and snow. Icebergs and ice floes risk damage to the kayak and motor and the area is home to polar bears. Domjan will maneuver his kayak through this labyrinth of ice for approximately 14 hours a day – an enormous challenge. If he succeeds, he will be the first person to traverse the Northwest Passage in an electric-powered kayak when he reaches the settlement at Pond Inlet in September, 2015. His full route can be seen at http://bit.ly/1L2N6t3.

Contact Torqeedo Inc., 171 Erick Street Unit A-1, Crystal Lake, IL 60014. 815-444-8806; Fax: 815-444-8807 usa@torqeedo.com; www.torqeedo.com.

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Photo Crédit: Lucas Vuitel

 GREEN DOCK is dedicated to supplying a forum to discuss important issues, products, and trends that can better help all of us protect the environment. Your thoughts, ideas, opinions, and desire to make a change is most welcome. Please contact us by using the COMMENT tab at the lower right hand corner of this page.

 
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Posted by on June 23, 2015 in Green Dock

 

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        Face Off With The Enemy: Lionfish

 

U.S. Congressman Steve Southerland considers congressional hearing on invasive lionfish

I have met a lot of people during my tenure at the mastheads of the magazine end of the boating industry and many of them have quite passionate feelings about an overall concern for the environment we have decided to dedicate our lives to. Pete Johnson is an articulate, well-spoken gentleman and has taken up the cause of invasive species and the particular problems associated with them. To help get the message out, Pete sent me this latest release. Take a read and decide for yourself. -Capt. Ken

During a recent trip to Key West, Fla., U.S. Congressman Steve Southerland, (R), who serves on the House Natural Resources Committee and its Fisheries Subcommittee, got an up-close, personal look at an invasive lionfish.  Two rapidly reproducing and voracious non-native lionfish species, imported from the Indo-Pacific region, are wreaking havoc on fisheries and marine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico, Western Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea.

Southerland, who was attending a Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting, spent extra time to learn more about the lionfish invasion which is also growing more populous on the reefs near his hometown of Panama City, Fla.  The congressman serves Florida’s second district which includes over half of the Florida Panhandle’s coastal waters.

The  culprit. Beautiful and deadly at the same time. Photo by Dr. James Morris.

The culprit. Beautiful and deadly at the same time. Photo by Dr. James Morris, NOAA.

“We discussed the significance of this invasion and impacts on indigenous species,” said Kelly.  “While the typical fisherman may not know much about them, since lionfish are rarely caught on conventional fishing tackle, thousands of recreational divers, descending to 100 ft. depths, have observed growing numbers of them on popular Florida reefs, submerged wrecks and other underwater sites.  However, these population densities pale in comparison to lionfish aggregations found deeper (120-300’ or more) beyond safe recreational diving depths.”

“Anglers and the general public should be very concerned,” Kelly said. “For example juvenile groupers and snappers are among some 100 documented fish which lionfish prey on and despite its now 1-1/2 pound average size, the lionfish can live for about 15 years and most likely double in size again.”  Marine researchers at the Lionfish Summit reported a single lionfish necropsy verified consumption of 20 tropical fish in only 30 minutes time.  In highly infested areas native fish populations have been reduced by as much as 80% in five weeks.

“Crustaceans like crab, shrimp and even juvenile spiny lobster are also popular food sources found in the stomach contents,” Kelly added, “as are herbivores, the very important small colorful fish that help keep coral reefs free of algae. Divers in many communities have helped keep lionfish populations in check through organized lionfish derbies and contests by spearing and hand-netting them.”

“In the five-year history since 2009 when lionfish were first spotted in the Keys, commercial lobster trappers have been finding increasing numbers as by-catch in their spiny lobster traps.  The numbers and sizes of lionfish have skyrocketed from 49 lbs at a 1/3 lb average caught the first year, to more than 10,000 pounds in 2013 averaging more than a pound apiece, as reported by just one commercial fisherman during an eight month fishing season.”

U.S. Congressman Steve Southerland (left), of Panama City, Fla., and Capt. Bill Kelly, Exec. Dir. of the Florida Keys Commercial Fisherman’s Association, view a lionfish on display in an aquarium at the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary’s Eco-Discovery Center in Key West, Fla. Two rapidly reproducing and voracious non-native lionfish species, imported from the Indo-Pacific region, are wreaking havoc on fisheries and marine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico, Western Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea. (Photo courtesy of Melissa Thompson)

U.S. Congressman Steve Southerland (left), of Panama City, Fla., and Capt. Bill Kelly, Exec. Dir. of the Florida Keys Commercial Fisherman’s Association, view a lionfish on display in an aquarium at the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary’s Eco-Discovery Center in Key West, Fla. Two rapidly reproducing and voracious non-native lionfish species, imported from the Indo-Pacific region, are wreaking havoc on fisheries and marine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico, Western Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea. (Photo courtesy of Melissa Thompson)

“And as we explained to Congressman Southerland, our commercial lobster trappers have seen denser populations of lionfish in deeper waters from 100 to 300 feet,” said Kelly.  “By developing the right trapping methods, lionfish could become a very valuable and nutritious consumer commodity while protecting our ecosystems.”

History of the Lionfish Invasion

The first sighting of lionfish in U.S. waters was reported in 1985 in the Atlantic waters off Dania Beach near Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.  It was believed to have been released by a tropical fish enthusiast who may have grown tired of caring for the exotic import, which may have been eating other expensive and colorful fish in his tank.

Indigenous to the tropical waters of the South Pacific, lionfish populations are held in check in their native habitat by natural predation. However, invasive lionfish have no natural predators and have spread rapidly in the past 29 years in sub-tropical and temperate waters of the northern hemisphere.  Just one female is capable of producing as many as 30,000 eggs every four days or more than two million eggs a year.

With a thermal tolerance of about 50 degrees, some 35 degrees less than their native habitat, lionfish have been found in Atlantic waters as far north as Rhode Island. In the U.S. the heaviest concentrations have been from Carolina waters south to the Florida Keys. They have also spread throughout the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the Bahamas, the Caribbean Islands and eastern Central and northern South America.

The ornate red and white stripped lionfish possesses 18 venomous spines on its dorsal fin and its pelvic and anal fins, which are used for defense. Its venom, a protein-based neurotoxin, can cause severe pain and swelling. Spearfishermen and commercial fishermen use safety techniques such as long spears, hand nets and puncture proof gloves to carefully avoid the spines. Though the spines, which are removed during the cleaning process, are venomous, it has no effect on the lionfish meat which is considered a delicacy and cooked in a variety of recipes.

Next Steps

Kelly said he and Southerland discussed several core issues. “Besides talking about how quickly this invasion occurred, the damages to the ecosystem and how widespread it has become, our hour-long conversation included containment methods such as divers using spears and nets near shore, and major emphasis on a well-monitored commercial trapping program offshore. Once that begins we’ll tie-in consumer awareness and educational program, leading to bigger demand for these fish in more restaurants, seafood houses and grocery store fish counters.” Southerland, Kelly said, was very concerned and indicated he would call for a subcommittee hearing before the House Natural Resources Committee.

“The alarm was sounded over 20 years ago by NOAA biologist and ecologist Dr. James Morris.  Now, in a relatively short period of time, we may very well be facing one of the most threatening marine invasions of our lifetime.  Until such time as native species of fish acquire an appetite for lionfish, if they ever do, our most promising method of containment will be a well-designed and closely monitored commercial trapping venture.  Time is of the essence,” said Kelly.

           GREEN DOCK is dedicated to supplying a forum to discuss important issues, products, and trends that can better help all of us protect the environment. Your thoughts, ideas, opinions, and desire to make a change is most welcome. Please contact us by using the COMMENT tab at the lower right hand corner of this page.

 For more information, contact Pete Johnson, Johnson Communications, Inc. E-mail: JohnsonCom@aol.com, ph: 480-951-3654

 

 
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Posted by on July 31, 2014 in Green Dock

 

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