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Green Dock

Green Dock

Centek BilgeKleen™ Filter System
Prevents Overboard Discharge of Oil & Fuel

An easy to install filter will help keep pollutants from being transferred to the water.

Continuing in our endeavors to bring you information from those companies who focus on issues concerning products and systems than can and will impact the environment, Centek Industries has consistently been in the forefront of the movement towards helping the boating industry deal with these issues.

The Centek Industries BilgeKleen™ filter system automatically removes oil, gas, diesel fuel and other hydrocarbon pollutants from bilge water before it is discharged overboard.

bilgekleen

The patented system uses a filtering medium that binds to hydrocarbons and allows water to pass through freely. As a result, over 99.9% of the hydrocarbon pollutants are captured, with no increase in pressure to the bilge pump. Installs easily to the bilge pump discharge line and includes an absorbent pad for the bilge sump area to capture harmful contaminants where they form.

A variety of BilgeKleen system sizes are available from Centek’s worldwide dealer network to fit almost any bilge space or application, from runabouts to megayachts and commercial vessels.

More info: Centek Industries web site or call 1+229.228.7653.

Centek Industries – 116 Plantation Oak Drive – Thomasville, GA 31792 USA

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2016 in Green Dock

 

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Maintenance

Maintenance

Exhaustive Knowledge

An awareness of what is going on with your exhaust system can keep your engine running at peak performance and avoid costly repairs.

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

Years back, a friend of mine, short a mate for a late afternoon, early evening six-pack charter, asked me to work the deck for him. Fishing was good and on the way back to the barn, with just a few minutes to his dock, I noticed we were riding a bit low in the water and that the bilge pumps were now discharging fairly regularly. I told him about it and decided we would check things out as soon as we were shut down and our fishermen were on their way.

We discovered there was quite a bit of water below as well as having collected forward. I asked him to hit the starter button and as the engine turned over, I was shocked to see raw water pouring out from underneath the hose connecting to the riser. Instead of being discharged out the exhaust pipe, it was bucketing into the boat. When we took things apart, we discovered the riser itself was totally corroded from the inside with very little material left being held by the hose clamps. We had dodged a very big bullet and one that neither of us would ever forget.

Just like any other critical part of your boat’s engine, the exhaust system needs proper attention to ensure safe and smooth operation. Besides the chance of being exposed to noxious fumes, not doing so can lead to severe engine problems and yes, even sinking.

exhaustimage1

Checking out your boat’s exhaust system should be a part of your regular preventive maintenance regimen. Photo: DeAngelo Exhaust Systems

We usually take the exhaust system for granted and expect there is little if anything that can go wrong. First mistake. This is a very important maintenance component and while you should call in the experts if you suspect there is a problem brewing, there are some things you can look for to help you head off the sticker shock of a major engine overhaul.

By now, we all know that when an up stroking cylinder compresses atomized diesel fuel—or when a spark goes off in a gasoline engine—there is detonation. Once that occurs, the resultant gases given off need somewhere to go. And it is during the exhaust phase of your engine’s operation that this is accomplished. Not being able to efficiently do so will result in backpressure problems, the first of many that can occur.

“Most people don’t worry about it until something goes wrong; and when it does, it can be pretty bad,” says Jorge Lang, Operations Manager at Ft. Lauderdale’s DeAngelo Exhaust Systems. “Think of it as a human being; it has to inhale, through the air intakes, and exhale through the exhaust.”

Basically, backpressure is the inability for your engine to breathe properly and as easily as it should and results in poor performance, a cut in fuel economy, and decreased speed. In addition, there can be consequential damage to internal engine parts such as valves, stems, injectors, and critical gaskets. “If the exhaust is running straight out, you have no backpressure. But if it has to go through a ninety degree turn or through a muffler, or you’re going to throw water into that gas flow, your adding resistance.”

corroded-riser

A corroded riser, left unchecked, can cause problems no one needs. Photo: BoatUS

Given the fact that diesel engine manufactures do not supply exhaust risers with their engines, this critical piece of equipment is therefore, an after market component where improper system design and sizing, that being the diameter of the exhaust pipe, can worsen the problem. “If the material used is also not of the proper grade, what you wind up with is a lethal combination of metal, exhaust fumes, and salt water that does not get along very well,” said Lang. “We’ve seen it all; some even thinking a Home Depot pipe job will suffice.”

Poorly designed exhausts can also allow water to flow back into the exhaust manifold, especially during large following sea conditions, and make its way into the engine. “There are a number of factors that determine how long a riser will last. Some of these include the quality of the welds, materials used, if the riser holds water when the engine is shut down, and how well it is supported.” Lang also suggests a regular inspection underneath your engine bed and stringers to look for rust spots, indicating a possible leak coming from somewhere.

Just as with your other important engine parameters, it’s best to have a base line for your exhaust system including correct operating temps for both cooling and exhaust systems, the right amount of visible exhaust flow should you not have an under water system, and of course, taking regular back pressure readings from your engine monitoring data. OEM’s have different predetermined backpressure limits based on critical internal features, so it’s best to check your engine manual or have the discussion with your engine manufacturer. Remember, the higher the backpressure, the more restricted the exhaust system will be. “Exceeding those limits will lead to problems,” said Lang.

Salt Deposit

A salt deposit on a muffler indicates a weeping spot where water is escaping. Photo: Centek Industries

But what if your running bottom and props are not fouled and your backpressure is within acceptable limits? “This happens a lot, especially with boats up north that are stored for the winter,” says Mechanical Engineer and Manager of Centek Industries’ Product Design & Engineering Bert Browning. “Something may have made its winter home in the exhaust pipe and either died or made a nest or some other kind of living space.” A careful check for obstructions before getting your boat back in the water should be part of your regular preventive maintenance regimen.

“While backpressure issues can result in higher exhaust temps you don’t necessarily need to have backpressure problems for this to result,” offered Browning. You can have some cooling water issues as a result of a faulty water raw pump or failed impellers. These should also be checked regularly. If that impeller is degraded or damaged, not only will the proper amount of cooling water be diminished but, should any of the vanes break loose, the rubber material can be pushed all the way through the cooling system and severely clog the water flow. Or, you may have picked up a plastic bag or some other debris through the intake hose. In this case, make sure you shut off—and open once done—the seacock before attempting to have a look. And always make sure, just as you check your oil and fluid levels before starting up, to have a look at your raw water strainer and clean the basket if any debris or fouling is present.

Another area to check is the condition of the blue and black hoses and the clamps, especially those connected to the riser and the mixing elbow. With high temperature ratings, blue hose, rated at 350F if preferable. Any telltale problems will show up as a discoloration on some portion of the hose, usually at the clamp site. And it’s a given that hoses should be double clamped. Other revealing signs, such as those with fiberglass, gelcoated, or even Awlgripped systems, will be a yellowish-brown discoloration and ‘flaky’ deterioration. “With fiberglass, over time, the resin will ‘cook out’ and start weeping resulting in salt deposits forming on the exterior surface of the exhaust pipe,” said Browning. “Losing the resin will cause the pipe to eventually soften and compress under the clamp force.”

DSC_2554

A well-maintained exhaust system will result in better engine performance, improved fuel economy, and less impact on the environment. Photo: Ken Kreisler

Keeping tabs on your exhaust system is as important as any other aboard your boat. Check with your yard manager during yearly haul out time and have the risers inspected as part of your maintenance regimen. Besides the fact that exhaust fumes are noxious and can cause health problems, your engine will not be running as efficiently as it was designed to do and, allowed to continue operating under diminished conditions, will lead to costly repairs.

 
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Posted by on December 30, 2015 in Maintenance

 

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Maintenance

Maintenance

Frequently Asked Questions About Marine Exhaust Systems

The experts at Centek Industries offer some advice on this vital component.

At Centek headquarters in Thomasville, Georgia (USA), company experts frequently answer questions about the design, engineering and manufacturing of custom marine exhaust systems. Centek’s engineering staff has more than 80 years of marine wet exhaust system design and innovation experience. Centek is the only registered engineering firm to offer fiberglass exhaust components that are Lloyd’s Register Type approved and meet or exceed ABYC-P1 standards. Centek has also earned a Certificate of Conformance for ISO 9001:2008, for the excellence of its quality management system.

Salt Deposit

A salt deposit on a muffler indicates a “weeping” spot where water is escaping.

Here are three of the most frequently asked questions.

1. How do I make my boat quieter?
This one is right in our wheel house. There are several options available when it comes to sound attenuation for both propulsion and generator engines. Centek assigns a rating to their standard exhaust products with the range going from Good to Better to Best. Generally speaking, and compared to straight exhaust, the Good rated muffler provides 15-18 dB of attenuation, a Better rated muffler gives a 22-28 dB improvement and a Best provides an improvement of 25-30 dB. These are ball park estimates and should be used as a rule of thumb. Also available are custom systems which can provide even better results depending on your specific engine and space available. For generator exhaust, these same standard mufflers and ratings are used but at the same time there are other considerations to take into account. Is the noise you are hearing actually the engine running or is it the irritating splash you hear as the exhaust cooling water is discharged overboard? If the overboard discharge is the culprit, consider adding a Gen-Sep and separate the cooling water from the exhaust gasses. The exhaust gas is then discharged to the atmosphere and the cooling water is discharged below the water line thus elimination the splash you hear when the gen-set is running.

Centek Marine Exhaust

A Centek installation offers complete access to its exhaust systems.

2. I am doing a re-power – can I use the same exhaust?
This is usually one of the first questions asked when it comes to a re-power for both propulsion engines and for generator upgrades / changes. The short answer is maybe. To get the most from your new engine or gen-set, it is important to make sure that the exhaust system is properly sized. A properly sized exhaust system provides the best sound attenuation and stays within the backpressure limits set by the engine manufacturer. When Centek engineers recommend a specific size, they take into account a number of variables which include, but are not limited to, horsepower, raw water flow, exhaust flow and temperatures, the position of components relative to the waterline and the backpressure limits. If you have a question whether or not your current system will work, call and talk with a Centek engineer and let them help guide you through the process. Also, keep in mind that Centek can supply an almost endless variety of elbows and fittings for your new project.

3. I have a leaking muffler. How can I fix it?
Often customers call in with questions about mufflers or other exhaust components that have developed a leak. In addition to looking for dripping water on the muffler body or water in the area of the muffler, another sign to look for is salt deposits on the muffler. These salt deposits appear as a white chalky substance and indicate a “weeping” spot where water is escaping. Before any consideration of a repair or replacement, first determine why the leak occurred. Almost 100% of the time, this type of leak indicates that the muffler experienced overheating due to a loss of cooling water in the exhaust stream. If the cause of overheating is not corrected, any repair is going to be short lived. Centek uses high temperature resins in all our products; however, if cooling water is interrupted, exhaust temperatures can sky rocket quickly. When temperatures reach a certain point, the resin is essentially baked out of the resin/glass matrix causing water droplets to seep from the damaged area.

JB 64

Having your exhaust system operating at peak performance will result in safer and more enjoyable time while out on the water. Photo courtesy of Jarrett Bay Boatworks.

When a muffler or other exhaust component develops a leak, the best course of action is to replace the item. A good fiberglass shop can patch a leak on a temporary basis but replacement is critical. Keep in mind, when cooling water is lost and temperatures spike, damage can occur to the internals of the muffler or component which is often impossible see.

Have a question about marine exhaust systems? Ask the experts at Centek. Emailinfo@centekindustries.com, fax your question to 1+229.228.1270, or call 1+800.950.7653 (toll free in the US) or 1+229.228.7653. For more information about Centek, visit http://www.centekindustries.com

 
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Posted by on December 18, 2015 in Maintenance

 

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Maintenance

Maintenance

Exhaustive Knowledge

An awareness of what is going on with your exhaust system can keep your engine running at peak performance and avoid costly repairs.

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

Years back, a friend of mine, short a mate for a late afternoon, early evening six-pack charter, asked me to work the deck for him. Fishing was good and on the way back to the barn, with just a few minutes to his dock, I noticed we were riding a bit low in the water and that the bilge pumps were now discharging fairly regularly. I told him about it and decided we would check things out as soon as we shut down and our fishermen were on their way.

Make your exhaust system part of your regular preventive maintenance regimen.

Make your exhaust system part of your regular preventive maintenance regimen. Photo Credit: DeAngelo Exhaust

We discovered there was quite a bit of water below as well as having collected forward. I asked him to hit the starter button and as the engine turned over, I was shocked to see raw water pouring out from underneath the hose connecting to the riser. Instead of being discharged out the exhaust pipe, it was bucketing into the boat. When we took things apart, we discovered the riser itself was totally corroded from the inside with very little material left being held by the hose clamps. We had dodged a very big bullet and one that neither of us would ever forget.

This kind of extreme corrosion in an exhaust manifold can mean big problems. Photo Credit:  BoatUS.

This kind of extreme corrosion in an exhaust riser can mean big problems. Photo Credit: BoatUS.

Just like any other critical part of your boat’s engine, the exhaust system needs proper attention to ensure safe and smooth operation. Besides the chance of being exposed to noxious fumes, not doing so can lead to severe engine problems and yes, even sinking.

We usually take the exhaust system for granted and expect there is little if anything that can go wrong. First mistake. This is a very important maintenance component and while you should call in the experts if you suspect there is a problem brewing, there are some things you can look for to help you head off the sticker shock of a major engine overhaul.

Water comes in; water goes out. A simple operation that carries a lot of importance in the safe and proper operation of your boat.

Water comes in; water goes out. A simple operation that carries a lot of importance in the safe and proper operation of your boat.

By now, we all know that when an up stroking cylinder compresses atomized diesel fuel—or when a spark goes off in a gasoline engine—there is detonation. Once that occurs, the resultant gases given off need somewhere to go. And it is during the exhaust phase of your engine’s operation that this is accomplished. Not being able to efficiently do so will result in back pressure problems, the first of many that can occur.

“Most people don’t worry about it until something goes wrong; and when it does, it can be pretty bad,” says Jorge Lang, Operations Manager at Ft. Lauderdale’s DeAngelo Exhaust Systems. “Think of it as a human being; it has to inhale, through the air intakes, and exhale through the exhaust.”

Basically, back pressure is the inability for your engine to breathe properly and as easily as it should and results in poor performance, a cut in fuel economy, and decreased speed. In addition, there can be consequential damage to internal engine parts such as valves, stems, injectors, and critical gaskets. “If the exhaust is running straight out, you have no back pressure. But if it has to go through a ninety degree turn or through a muffler, or you’re going to throw water into that gas flow, you’re adding resistance.”

No matter how big your boat is, always know the proper water flow of  your exhaust system and if any restriction is suspected, shut down and have it checked out immediately.

No matter how big your boat is, always know the proper water flow of your exhaust system. If any restriction is suspected, shut down and have it checked out immediately.

Given the fact that diesel engine manufactures do not supply exhaust risers with their engines, this critical piece of equipment is therefore, an after market component where improper system design and sizing, that being the diameter of the exhaust pipe, can worsen the problem. “If the material used is also not of the proper grade, what you wind up with is a lethal combination of metal, exhaust fumes, and salt water that does not get along very well,” said Lang. “We’ve seen it all; some even thinking a Home Depot pipe job will suffice.”

A failed gasket can cause a leak.

A failed gasket can cause a leak in the system.

Poorly designed exhausts can also allow water to flow back into the exhaust manifold, especially during large following sea conditions, and make its way into the engine. “There are a number of factors that determine how long a riser will last. Some of these include the quality of the welds, materials used, if the riser holds water when the engine is shut down, and how well it is supported.” Lang also suggests a regular inspection underneath your engine bed and stringers to look for rust spots, indicating a possible leak coming from somewhere.

Just as with your other important engine parameters, it’s best to have a base line for your exhaust system including correct operating temps for both cooling and exhaust systems, the right amount of visible exhaust flow should you not have an under water system, and of course, taking regular back pressure readings from your engine monitoring data. OEM’s have different predetermined back pressure limits based on critical internal features, so it’s best to check your engine manual or have the discussion with your engine manufacturer. Remember, the higher the back pressure, the more restricted the exhaust system will be. “Exceeding those limits will lead to problems,” said Lang.

But what if your running bottom and props are not fouled and your back pressure is within

Impellers should be changed at regular intervals to prevent any overheating problems with proper engine operations.

Impellers should be changed at regular intervals to prevent any overheating problems with proper engine operations.

acceptable limits? “This happens a lot, especially with boats up north that are stored for the winter,” says Mechanical Engineer and Manager of Centek Industries’ Product Design & Engineering Bert Browning. “Something may have made its winter home in the exhaust pipe and either died or made a nest or some other kind of living space.” A careful check for obstructions before getting your boat back in the water should be part of your regular preventive maintenance regimen.

“While back pressure issues can result in higher exhaust temps you don’t necessarily need to have back pressure problems for this to result,” offered Browning. You can have some cooling water issues as a result of a faulty water raw pump or failed impellers. These should also be checked regularly. If that impeller is degraded or damaged, not only will the proper amount of cooling water be diminished but, should any of the vanes break loose, the rubber material can be pushed all the way through the cooling system and severely clog the water flow. Or, you may have picked up a plastic bag or some other debris through the intake hose. In this case, make sure you shut off—and open once done—the seacock before attempting to have a look. And always make sure, just as you check your oil and fluid levels before starting up, to have a look at your raw water strainer and clean the basket if any debris or fouling is present.

Always make sure to check your exhaust hoses and the clamps for any sign of wear.

Always make sure to check your exhaust hoses and the clamps (right) for any sign of wear.

Another area to check is the condition of the blue and 443606black hoses and the clamps, especially those connected to the riser and the mixing elbow. With high temperature ratings, blue hose, rated at 350F if preferable. Any telltale problems will show up as a discoloration on some portion of the hose, usually at the clamp site. And it’s a given that hoses should be double clamped. Other revealing signs, such as those with fiberglass, gelcoated, or even Awlgripped systems, will be a yellowish-brown discoloration and ‘flaky’ deterioration. “With fiberglass, over time, the resin will ‘cook out’ and start weeping resulting in salt deposits forming on the exterior surface of the exhaust pipe,” said Browning. “Losing the resin will cause the pipe to eventually soften and compress under the clamp force.”

Keeping tabs on your exhaust system is as important as any other aboard your boat. Check with your yard manager during yearly haul out time and have the risers inspected as part of your maintenance regimen. Besides the fact that exhaust fumes are noxious and can cause health problems, your engine will not be running as efficiently as it was designed to do and, allowed to continue operating under diminished conditions, will lead to costly repairs.

For more information on exhaust systems and proper operation, contact http://www.deangelomarine.com; http://www.centekindustries.com

If you would like us to cover a maintenance issue that is of particular interest to you, please feel free to drop us a line by tabbing the LEAVE A COMMENT key located at the bottom, right hand side of this page.

 
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Posted by on January 17, 2014 in Maintenance

 

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Products

 

Centek Marlin Series Streamline Mufflers

With sound attenuation similar to the Vernatone™, the Marlin Series from marine exhaust systems manufacturer Centek Industries is an excellent solution for those who demand performance and need to save room for extra fuel capacity or additional equipment. Available in a wide range of standard sizes from 5 inches and above for both gas and diesel engine applications, custom sizes are also available. Centek offers professional engineering support for specific, custom applications. ABS certified and Lloyd’s Register Type approved.

The Marlin Series is also available on request with Centek’s YachtPlus finish. This durable, automotive quality finish withstands harsh marine and engine room environments. A multiple-step process involving meticulous sanding and priming, with three-part paints commonly used for high end marine finishes from leading paint suppliers. Custom matching with other engine room components and/or colors.

More info: www.centekindustries.com or call 1+229.228.7653.

Centek Industries – 116 Plantation Oak Drive – Thomasville, GA 31799 USA

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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