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USCG-APPROVED SLIMLINE A-60 FIRE DAMPER IS NOW AVAILABLE

The bar on safety aboard is once again raised by Delta “T” Systems.

Delta “T” Systems, global leader in marine ventilation, has unveiled its new Slimline Fire Damper, the narrowest in the market at only 4.25″ deep. It’s USCG approved for use in penetrating Class A-0, A-15, A-30 and A-60 bulkheads and decks, and Wheelmark certified under the EU Marine Equipment Directive (MED).

Built in the USA of 100% 316 stainless steel, the patent pending Slimline Fire Damper is an innovative, yet robust design. All the components are thicker and stronger than the competition, making the device uniquely durable. Its overlapping blades rotate in parallel for strength and have a patented locking mechanism for keeping the damper closed during a fire event. Its thin profile provides boatbuilders the ability to conserve machinery room space and adapt the unit to existing areas.

delta-t

Its thermal tripping device is mounted on a separate bracket. When the machinery space reaches 165° F, the sensor trips the actuator, closing the damper. It’s manually resettable so it won’t need to be replaced in the event of unintended exposure to excess heat. It also comes with a test switch to check functionality when completing inspections.

The failsafe actuator produces 180 in-lb of closing torque, powered by 24-240V AC or 24-125V DC. The unit has dry contact outputs for open/closed readouts. It fits an NEMA2 IP54 ZP type 2 enclosure and is CE approved.

“To support the demand that this new damper is generating, we’ve introduced new manufacturing capabilities and equipment,” said Lynn Oien, Delta “T” Systems president. The company recently hired production manager Tony Matherly, who has spearheaded the manufacturing initiative.

Order turnaround times are extremely quick due to the 28 standard sizes from 9″ x 9″ to 46.75″ x 46.75″. Unlimited custom individual sizes are available up to 46.75″ x 46.75″. They come fully assembled and ready to install.

Contact Delta “T” Systems, 858 W 13th Ct., Riviera Beach, FL 33404. 561-204-1500; Fax: 561-848-1611.info@deltatsystems.com; http://www.deltatsystems.com

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Posted by on November 16, 2016 in Products

 

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BoatUS Report

BoatuslogoTop 10 Pieces Of Gear For Runabouts

As a follow up to my timely posting of information on making a case for the versatile deckboat, my friend Scott Croft at BoatUS sent me this handy list of important items one may want to consider having aboard before going out for the day or some extended time away from the dock.

You never know when having two anchors aboard is just what you will need should more options for anchoring be necessary.

You never know when having two anchors aboard is just what you will need should more options for anchoring be necessary.

As there’s a lot to be said for owning small runabouts, center consoles or bow riders, and while they are affordable, easy to store, and can keep everyone in the family happy, they have their limits, especially if you want to venture into coastal waters and big lakes. But these journeys can still be done, with the right ten pieces of equipment. Here’s what Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) recommends should be aboard every boat 20 feet or smaller:

paddle-quant-aluminum-kayaking-inflatablePaddles: If your engine quits, paddles are your propulsion. Keep the outboard or sterndrive down for a rudder, and if you’ve got a buddy or a spouse aboard, you can make decent headway. A T-handle paddle, the kind used for whitewater canoeing, gives you a great grip. The aluminum shaft is light and strong, as is the high-impact plastic blade. Those materials don’t mind sitting out in the weather, either. Make sure they’re at least five feet long.

Dry box: Small boats typically lack dry storage. Large, plastic marine dry images-1boxes with lids with O-rings seal out moisture and an extra-deep model can hold the radio, smartphone, flashlight, GPS and more, leaving them dry when you need them.

Anchors and line: Some small-boat manufacturers barely leave space for a lunch hook. But what happens if your engine quits, or you want to anchor overnight in a quiet cove? Stowing two anchors with different line lengths gives you options. Chain between line and anchor also helps. And don’t forget a few docklines. (See image above.)

images-2Wearable life jacket: Luckily, life jacket design has evolved and you can find Type III vest-style models that are comfortable to wear all day. Plenty of small-boat owners wear inflatable jackets. They’re more buoyant, but more costly and require some care. Your best choice is any life jacket you’ll always wear.

Compatible power source for electronics: When your cell phone runsimages-3 out of juice during a nautical emergency, that’s a crisis. Same goes for your flashlight, handheld GPS unit and VHF radio. Get devices that run on the same power source such as AA batteries and stow and extra sealed pack of batteries in the dry box.

images-4Manual bailer: Small, closed-deck boats rely on a single, submersible pump to keep the bilge dry. But if that pump fails, or seawater comes over the gunwales or stern, or there’s heavy rain, you’ve got a problem. Keeping a hand-operated bilge pump aboard is cheap insurance.

Air Horn: The US Coast Guard says small boats must images-5have a “sound-producing device” for distress signaling, capable of a four-second blast that’s audible one quarter-mile away. While a plastic whistle or an installed electric horn may meet the letter of the law, a better choice is a handheld, gas-powered air horn, which can be heard at greater distances.

images-6Spare prop and fix-It tools: A submerged ledge images-7or log can ding your prop and cripple your boat. Having a spare prop and the right wrench is common advice, but changing a mangled wheel while afloat is easier said than done. Dents in aluminum props can be put back into serviceable shape, at least enough to get home. Beefy, vice-grip-style locking pliers and slip-joint pliers are essential for this repair.

images-8Have a charging source: Cell phones don’t run on AA batteries. That’s why you need a marine rated 12-volt receptacle with a weatherproof cap. Mount it away from spray and rain, and don’t forget the charging cords for other electronics.

Paper chart in plastic cover: Even a waterproof 3606chart is hard to manage underway in an open boat. But by putting it in a clear, plastic holder, wind and water won’t matter it will always be ready when you need it. You can buy one or make one with clear plastic from the hardware store and duct tape.

Safe travels shipmates.- Capt. Ken

                                          ________________________

About BoatUS: Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) is the nation’s leading advocate for recreational boaters providing its over half-million members with government representation, services such as 24-hour on water boat towing as well as roadside assistance for boat trailers and tow vehicles, feature-packed boat insurance programs, money-saving benefits that include marina and West Marine shopping discounts, and vital information that improves recreational boating. Its member-funded BoatUS Foundation is a national leader promoting safe, clean and responsible boating.

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2014 in BoatUS Report

 

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