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Monthly Archives: December 2013

Sea Trials

DSC_1255Velvet Glove, Iron Fist

Don’t be put off by this convertible’s enclosed bridge comfort. She is all business when it comes to being a hard-core sportfishing boat, Viking style.

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

The helicopter with photographer Shaw McCutcheon leaning out its open door was hovering just ahead of us as Capt. Ryan Higgins, the Southeast Sales Manager and demo skipper for Viking Yachts, and myself, along with Viking’s Director of Communications Peter Frederiksen, barreled our way south at about 38 knots in the down sea moderate chop along the Palm Beach coastline and past the fabled mansions of this storied haunt of the uber wealthy. As I glanced at the Spanish-tiled tower of Mar-A-Lago slipping by to starboard, and then around at the outstanding accommodations I was presently surrounded by, I thought, “Hey, this isn’t too shabby in the least.” That’s because we were aboard Viking’s latest battlewagon, the 62EB, a boat possessing all that this premier builder is noted for and a bit more.

Her DNA is pure Viking but her enclosed bridge elevates the 62EB to new levels of comfort.

Her DNA is pure Viking but her enclosed bridge elevates the 62EB to new levels of comfort.

Higgins, Frederiksen, and I were in the midst of a lively conversation when the chopper rose straight up as we passed underneath it. While a common maneuver on these combo sea trial/photo shoots, I noticed on this pass, as well as the half-dozen more to come, that I could barely hear the usual chest pounding sound made by the rotors followed by the helicopter’s ramped-up motor veering off to port and coming abreast of us, following along at about 20 feet above the water. But that was just the first of many outstanding features I discovered on my day aboard the 62EB.

One of the more important hallmarks of any boat builder is its ability to not only produce a quality, superior product but to also recognize that in its own designs, there is room for improvement. “We are always keeping a pulse on things; taking careful note of our own in-house input and most importantly, that from our customer base,” said Frederiksen. “Viking’s mantra is to build a better boat every day.”

Comfort and luxury are part of having an enclosed bridge area.

Comfort and luxury are part of having an enclosed bridge area.

Looking around the enclosed bridge layout, with its great 360-degree views, I could easily see the result of that statement. Pulling double duty as a lounge area and entertainment space, the roomy and well-appointed bridge offers comfort and luxury while not compromising any function of the skipper’s duties whether sitting back and enjoying the ride or getting in on the fish.

To the point, the leather-bound centerline helm has more than ample room on which to flush mount a vast array of electronics, navigational instruments, and virtually anything else one might desire. A comfortable single Stidd helm pedestal affords easy access to all controls and as I eased myself up and settled in, I glanced at the displays from port to starboard and back again, noticing how easy it was to view the all-important information from each screen or read out.

Aft and to starboard is an L-shape leather couch and directly to port is a double co-pilot’s seat, also covered in soft leather. Directly behind this seat is a built-in curvy wood console complete with a small refrigerator and a bulkhead-mounted flat screen TV above. There is carpeting underfoot—a teak or Amtico sole could easily be envisioned—and beautifully finished woodwork all around.

The afthelm provides the skipper with the all-important visuals over the cockpit and out into the water.

The aft helm provides the skipper with the all-important visuals over the cockpit and out into the water.

Outside the aft door, I found a complete port steering station which, expertly demonstrated by Higgins, showed off the nimbleness and finesse of the 62EB’s ability to back down on a big fish or any other situation where steering from this vantage point is warranted. There is even an additional seat to starboard affording a spectacular aft view of all the action. Other features out here include teaser reels in the overhead, a pair of cockpit-aimed LED lights, and a ladder to the hardtop in the event access to the mounted electronic units is necessary.

Viking provides two ways to and from the bridge deck; a circular stairway is located to starboard in the salon and for the cockpit crew, a beefy, no-nonsense ladder. And being a Viking, her 172 square foot cockpit is complete with the requisite mezzanine, entry to the engine room, and all the necessary fishing amenities one would find on a competitive tourney boat. In addition, the lazarette is all wired and ready for a vessel-matched Seakeeper gyro stabilization system. Throw on a tower and ‘riggers, sign up your anglers, and get ready for some spirited blue water action.

A true sign of a well-engineered boat is its engine room and all too true aboard the 62EB.

A true sign of a well-engineered boat is its engine room and all too true aboard the 62EB.

The aforementioned engine room on the 62EB is a well planned and carefully laid out area that will bring immediate confidence and peace of mind to any skipper or hands on owner. With all critical maintenance areas readily accessible and plenty of room for any kind of two-handed work on both inboard and outboard sides of the engines, this well-lit space also features a bright white Awlgrip finish, a very user-friendly centralized sea water system with redundant variable speed pumps, a 27.5kW Onan genset—with additional space provided for an optional 21.5kW Onan as well—and a 58,000 Btu air conditioning system. If you appreciate engine rooms, this one is as comfortable as the enclosed bridge

In distinctive Viking fashion, and providing for both angling and traveling comfort, the 62EB offers an inviting and practical layout. As with the bridge deck, the spacious main salon features large windows on either side and to aft, a curvy console to starboard, peninsula galley with under counter freezer and refrigerator units—an island layout is available should one opt out of the stairway—L-shape leather couch to port and forward, a dining area. Storage space, as found everywhere aboard the 62EB, abounds here with plenty of cabinets for all the necessary ships stores. And whether in the amidships master or forepeak VIP, each with en suite heads, or either of the port side guest quarters, sharing a head—a three stateroom layout is also available, all with en suite heads—I found excellent headroom space, ample closets, and the kind of sumptuous surroundings one has come to expect from the Viking interior design team.

While deep water, big fish excitement is what this boat is all about, there's plenty of the same on the interior.

While deep water, big fish excitement is what this boat is all about, there’s plenty of the same found in the interior.

Built tough to face sea conditions that can be downright unfriendly, the 62EB’s composite cored hull is resin infused for reduced weight while not giving up anything on the physical strength of the structure.  Further weight reductions can also be found in Viking construction techniques involving coring stateroom and locker doors as well as cabinet fronts throughout the boat.

The master stateroom aboard a sportfishing boat as interpreted by Viking.

The master stateroom aboard a sportfishing boat as interpreted by Viking.

As you would expect, the 62EB is a spirited performer. Running on a straight V bottom to cut down on drag, a bit more chine beam below the waterline, and powered by a pair of 1,925-hp CAT 32A’s, she not only posted impressive speed averages—try 22.9 knots at 1500 rpm; 35.1 at 2000; and an exciting 42.5 at WOT—but accelerated from idle to 2100 rpm in just about 18 seconds. She cut tight turns, answered the helm quickly, and tracked straight and true

“We took a lot of what we were partial to on previous designs, like the 55C for example, and elevated them to the next level. With the 62EB, we went with softer lines and, as you noticed, lots of curves both inside and out,” remarked Higgins as we took a look around the exterior.

Noticeable is a lot more shape above the waterline with very little flat sections. The top deck has a more rounded shape to it and gone is the raised trunk cabin found, for example, on the 68C; a boat which was in the dock right next to ours and served as a dramatic example of the innovative exterior styling. Her proportions are pleasing to the eye, the unbroken sheer slopes gently from bow to transom, and together with the newly designed engine room vents—now longitudinal fiberglass fins instead of aluminum—adds to the exciting and dynamic profile of this boat.

The Viking 62EB has been designed, engineered, and built with both comfort and outstanding fishing capabilities. While my 62EB test boat wasn’t rigged for action, we did manage to spot a few cutting sailfish on the way back to her slip at the Viking service facility at Riviera Beach, Florida. Higgins, Frederiksen, and I looked at each other, kind of thinking, I imagined, along the same line: We’ll be back.  Viking Yachts. (609) 296-6000. http://www.vikingyachts.com

SPECFICATIONS

LOA: 63’1”
BEAM: 18’11”
DRAFT: 5’1”
DISPLACEMENT: 92,175 lbs.
FUEL: 1,800 gal. (2,155 optional)
WATER: 312 gal.
ENGINES: 2/1,925-hp CAT C32A
OPTIONAL ENGINES: 2/1,800-hp or 1,550-hp MAN V12; 2/1,825-hp CAT C32A; or 2/2,030-hp MTU Series 2000 V16 M91
Base Price: $3,298,000 w/2/1,925-hp CAT C32A

PERFORMANCE

RPM                        SPEED (kn)                        GPH                        RANGE (nm)
1500                        22.9                                    82                          472.8
1600                        25.5                                    99                          436.1
1700                        28.2                                    106                        450.4
1800                        30.7                                    123                        422.5
2000                        35.1                                    147                        403.6
2050                        36.3                                    154                        399.0
2100                        38.3                                    159                        407.3
2200                        39.7                                    172                        391.9
2300                        40.7                                    188                        367.0
WOT                        42.1                                    182                        392.2

Fuel consumption is based on (2) engines at any given RPM. Speed and ranges, if any, are estimates based on engineering calculations. Range is based on 90% fuel capacity. Actual performance will vary and be affected by water and weather conditions, load and conditions of boat, engines, and propellers. Speed will increase as fuel is consumed. All data is illustrative and not warranted.

vike62eb200

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Posted by on December 19, 2013 in Sea Trials

 

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Yacht Spotting and New Launches

Yacht Spotting and New Launches

New Category, Same Quality

With the introduction of its 251-CE, Grady White expands its line up of boats with a versatile performer.

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

A long time favorite with both inshore and offshore boating enthusiasts as well as with families, Grady White has enjoyed a well-deserved reputation for building an award-winning, well-engineered line of boats.

Every inch a Grady White, the new 251-CE is the first in the Coastal Explorer series.

Every inch a Grady White, the new 251-CE is the first in the Coastal Explorer series.

The Greenville, North Carolina-based company, established in 1959, and still owned by Eddie Smith and his family since 1968, offers four different models comprising 28 different boats; Center Console, Dual Console, Express Cabin, and Walkaround Cabin. And now, with the introduction of the 251-CE, the first of the Coastal Explorer series, you can make that five models and 29 boats in sizes covering 18 to 37 feet in length.

The 251-CE is the first of its kind from Grady-White, and is designed to provide peace of mind on big water and a piece of heaven for practicality, utility, ease of use and comfort around back waters, beaches, waterways, sounds and inlets. Here’s the Grady-White answer for off-the-beaten-track coastal family fun and versatility in skinnier water. And even though it is created for use inshore the 251-CE is not a “bay boat,” offering more offshore capability and versatility than any other kind of boat in the so-called “bay boat” genre.

It's easy to see how quickly the action can switch to fishing with this kind of equipment.

It’s easy to see how quickly the action can switch to fishing with this kind of equipment.

Featuring low gunwales to provide very easy access to the water, and a bow ladder for beaching, the 251-CE’s low profile is all new for Grady-White. And like all Grady’s, she

With her top rigged and ready, your 251-CE is a no-nonsense fishing machine.

With her top rigged and ready, your 251-CE is a no-nonsense fishing machine.

offers performance to match her style. Transformable seats forward and aft go from bench style to lounge, and make the boat perfect for playing and relaxing plus fun for socializing. Add rods and tackle and you have a fishing boat that is truly without peer. There is something for everyone in the family on this boat.

The 251-CE is every inch a solid, proven center console backed by over 50 years of heritage and design success that only Grady-White can offer. Her loaded features will further add to satisfaction levels earned from a reputation for quality, reliability, safety and craftsmanship.

251CE

251-CE Specifications
Beam Amidships: 8’6″ (2.59 m)
Bridge Clearance: 6’9″ (2.06 m) w/T-top: 7’9″ (2.36 m)
Center Line Length: 24’7″ (7.49 m)
Cockpit Depth: 20″ (0.51 m)
Hull Draft: 14″ (.36 m)
Maximum HP: 300 (224 kW)
Outboard Shaft Length: 25″ (0.64 m)
Standard Fuel Capacity: 80 gal. (303 l)
Transom Width: 8’3″ (2.51 m)
Weight w/o Engine: 3550 lb. (1610 kg)

If you are in the Greenville, North Carolina area and wish to see the 251-CE, along with all the other Grady White boats on the assembly line, visit the company at www.gradywhite and make an appointment. If this is your kind of boating, you will not be disappointed.

 
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Posted by on December 16, 2013 in Yacht Spotting And New Launches

 

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Yacht Spotting and New Launches

Yacht Spotting and New Launches

The Next Step

Lazzara Yachts introduces the latest edition to its motoryacht series, the LMY 64

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

Joining her 84- and 115-foot sisterships, the new LMY 64 is as luxurious as they come while able to deliver exciting performance.

Joining her 84- and 116-foot sisterships, the new LMY 64 is as luxurious as they come while able to deliver exciting performance.

During one of my several visits to the Tampa, Florida-based manufacturing home of Lazzara Yachts, Dick Lazzara, the company’s president, and I were sitting around the large dining room table in the on-premises, Italian-inspired palazzo digs where all prospective Lazzara owners come to ‘break bread’. I was doing a piece on an 84 footer and in order to complete my assignment, happily agreed to have lunch.

“It’s part of a tradition here at Lazzara,” he said as we finished up our antipasto and watched as the secondo corso, what would prove to be a wonderful serving of gnocci and bolognese sauce, made its way out of the cucina. “You see Ken, when someone buys one of our boats they become family. Now, you tell me, what better way is there to share things with family then to sit down and have something to eat,” he said, the smile coming from his bright blue eyes, his handsome face, and most importantly, his heart. “And drink,” he finished, raising a glass of fine Pinot Grigio and handing me a hunk of freshly baked Italian semolina bread.

Constant attention to detail and in tune with its owner base has allowed  Lazzara Yachts to maintain a lofty position in the industry.

Constant attention to detail and in tune with its owner base has allowed Lazzara Yachts to maintain a lofty position in the industry.

The mantra at Lazzara is a simple yet profound one, especially as it pertains to how the company does business: That one rarely has a second chance to make a first impression. And since 1955, when Dick’s father Vince, a chemical engineer originally from Chicago built his first boat, that same attitude towards everything the company does, still rings true.

The Lazzara family boardroom with Dick (center) and Brad (right) surrounded by the next generation of yacht builders and designers.

The Lazzara family boardroom with Dick (center) and Brad (right) surrounded by the next generation of yacht builders and designers.

The multi-generational boat builders now includes Dick, his three sons Joe, Rich, and Tony, brother Brad and his son Steve, whose collective energies, vision, and business acumen have been incorporated into every Lazzara Yacht that splashes down the ways at the facility’s docks.

With many industry trend-setting initiatives and innovative approaches to design, including

Comfort and elegance meet in perfect balance in the master stateroom

Comfort and elegance meet in perfect balance in the LMY 64’s master stateroom

the company’s trademarked Skylounge Cabriolet, its 106, 110, and 116 product lines, and in 2006 the stunningly beautiful and well-engineered LSX Series, boats that combine sport yachts with luxury, performance, and style, Lazzara Yachts now presents it’s the latest addition to its motoryacht line, the LMY 64.

I caught up with Lazzara and Company at this past Ft. Lauderdale International Boat Show and managed to shoulder my way aboard as onlookers, prospective owners, and the usual ‘tire kickers’ clamored aboard for a look-see. And yes, this boat is all one would expect from this builder; an expertly and thoughtfully designed yacht that is sleek, sexy, loaded with amenities and the latest in electronics and creature comforts, with an interior that is as comfortable as it is practical.

Her flybridge layout offers as much room, and a bit more, than most boats in her size range.

Her flybridge layout offers as much room, and a bit more, than most boats in her size range.

Comfortable accommodations for 8 plus crew are available.

Comfortable accommodations for 8 plus crew are available.

Entertaining possibilities are only limited by her owners' imaginations.

Entertaining possibilities are only limited by her owners’ imaginations.

LMY64 SPECIFICATIONS

Length Overall: 64’ 6”/19.6 m
Length at Waterline: 51’8”/15.7 m
Beam: 17’4”/5.3 m
Draft: 4’9”/1.45 m
Displacement: 73,500 lbs./33,340 kg
Fuel Capacity: (estimated) 800 gallons/3,028 L
Fresh Water Capacity: 200 gallons/756 L
Black Water Capacity: 80 gallons/303 L
Top Speed: (estimated) 34 knots
Cruising Speed: (estimated) 31 knots
Main Engines: (2x) VOLVO D13 IPS 1200 (900hp)
Propellers: Nibral duo prop
Generator Onan: 17 kW
Electrical System: 120V/240V, single phase, 60 Hz

With all the hubbub going on around the Lazzara display on the docks of Bahia Mar, it was a bit hectic trying to get some time to sit down with Dick. But I’m sure there’s another meal in my future, sooner rather than later, when it comes to getting her out on the water for an upcoming sea trail. Until then, she’ll have to be a feast for the eyes. Mangia!

images-4

http://www.lazzarayachts.com

 
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Posted by on December 12, 2013 in Yacht Spotting And New Launches

 

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Equipment

MercurySleight of Hand

A look at what Mercury Marine has come up with for effortless control over outboard engine boats.

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

The ability to safely maneuver your outboard powered boat around the dock just go a lot easier with Mercury's fingertip control system.

The ability to safely maneuver your outboard powered boat around the dock just got a lot easier with Mercury’s fingertip control system.

“Think of it this way: It’s as if you could take your palm, place it on top of your boat and be able to move it in any direction you want,” said Chris Chapman, Mercury Marine’s Application Development Engineer and joystick whiz for the company’s new outboard engine control system.

By now, since the introduction of the various joystick control systems over the years, we’ve become quite used to, and somewhat comfortable, with the concept. A twist here. A push there. Dial it around. A short learning curve for newbies and a definite game changer in significantly lowering the pucker factor while in close quarters docking situations or maneuvering. But to have this technology available for use with a pair of outboard engines? Still dubious? Try triple and quad applications as well.

Yes, joystick control has come to outboard engines and when the opportunity to test

A triple rigged center console proved a short, easy learning curve with the system.

A triple rigged center console proved a short, easy learning curve with the system.

Mercury Marine’s revolutionary system came up aboard a 39-foot Sea Vee center console equipped with triple 300-hp, four stroke Verado engines came my way, I jumped in with, well, both feet and one hand.

“Our system takes the joystick technology and passes it through the propulsion system,” Chapman said as he and I sat at the helm of the Sea Vee test boat. “We have dual and triple applications right now with quads and multiple stations coming by year’s end.”

With a smaller Boston Whaler 320 Outrage quietly hovering right outside the dock next to ours, the pair of 300-hp Verado’s going through their paces while on another demo ride, Chapman led me through the technology and practical applications of the system.

A key component to the system is this steering ram.

A key component to the system is this steering ram.

Taking its cues from the advanced and proven systems already in use for larger, diesel powered, pod, and stern driven boats, Mercury has been able to not only make inroads but come up with far-reaching designs in this technology as well. In short, the company has taken the ease of those systems, and especially with the simplicity of docking, and given them to outboard engines.

Vesselview presents a clear and easy to read screen covering all engine parameters.

Vesselview presents a clear and easy to read screen covering all engine parameters.

Once the domain of hard-core, offshore fishermen, in recent years the ccenter console design has become more popular with families. With Mercury’s joystick system you can, with proper instruction and practice, have multiple captains aboard, such as your wife and kids, who, with a much shorter learning curve than that with traditional controls dealing with wind and current, are not only capable of getting the boat back to the dock, but will be confident and comfortable with the skill set as well. “And our engineers have fine tuned and calibrated the fully integrated system—everything is manufactured by us in one location, from the engines, to the wiring harnesses and rigging, to the controls and autopilot—to a point where we can match the technology to the specific application necessary as pertains to the weight of a certain model of boat where the amount of thrust may not be needed,” Chapman said. In other words, heavy boats more and lighter boats less.

In developing its outboard joystick controls, Mercury took its cues from both its own internal pulse and that of the consumer. Noting the uptick rate in its successful Axius System, the engineers set their sights on moving the technology across all of the company’s product lines.

The system is so finely tuned that full control over a quad set up takes little effort.

The system is so finely tuned that full control over a quad set up takes little effort.

The sophisticated system has three control modules per engine; an engine control module that manages all of the core engine functions; a thrust vector module, responsible for all the steering functions; and lastly, a helm command and control module. When in operation, the system takes all its commands from the helm and transfers them for seamless and instantaneous response, telling the engine where it needs to steer and where it needs to be throttling and shifting.

The complete system.

The complete system.

Engaging the joystick control, you can completely and proportionally adjust to any point in between; if you want to go to starboard, merely press slightly in that direction and that engine will shift in reverse with the port going in forward as both splay out. In that way, the direction of the thrust will be directed under the center of gravity beneath the boat. If you need to add a little forward movement, merely push the joystick in that direction. The same goes for reverse, as there is no need at any time to come back to center. It’s that easy to continue adding those partial movements to keep things very fluid and maintain control over the boat’s momentum so as not to have to regain any motion as the boat moves into the dock.

With the triple engine application, as on my test boat, the center engine will follow

The system works with any Mercury power.

The system works with any Mercury power.

whichever engine is in reverse. So for a starboard movement, for example, where the starboard outside engine is in reverse, the center one will swing over and maintain the same angle and assist in reverse. And regardless of dual or triple engines, should the wind get your bow and momentarily put the boat out of shape, a mere twist of the control in the opposite direction will get things back on an even keel very quickly.

That hand-on-the-top-of-your-boat analogy of Chapman’s rings true when trying it out for the first time. The initial reaction is how immediate the response is to the command and how, when you first get your hand on the joystick, there is a tendency to twist too much and push too far. Looking aft and seeing those three, 300-hp Verado engines hanging off the transom can be a bit intimidating. But very quickly, and with a bit of practice, the ‘feel’ for things settles in and quite soon after that, your confidence and proficiency with the system will astound you.

As we discussed the experience, Chapman backed up my reaction. “This is a real, intuitive way to move around the dock. With traditional ‘stick’ operation, there is usually a lot of movement to jockey into the correct position. With this system, all that is eliminated. For a non-boater, someone unfamiliar with bringing a boat back-in to a dock, we can usually have them comfortable after and hour or so of instruction and practice.”

The system also includes an auto trim feature. When coming down off plane from running, you usually tuck the drives back down to minimize the bow rise. What the joystick does is, as soon as it is touched, is take that fully tucked trim position and trims the engines back out to a factory preset point so that they are mostly level with the bottom of the boat.

Engaging Skyhook enables you to hold your boat in position regardless of wind or current.

Engaging Skyhook enables you to hold your boat in position regardless of wind or current.

Furthering the joystick experience, there are several high-tech options available including a fully integrated Mercury autopilot with waypoint sequencing so you can easily chart your course. Other premium features include a control pad for activating any of the joystick features and Skyhook®, Mercury’s patented ‘hovering’ system. Activating it will keep your boat in place against wind and current or while waiting for a spot to open at the fuel dock. It can also be used to get yourself together while shaping up for docking manuevers and is a real advantage to offshore fishermen as well with no need to try and anchor in deep water or move off a wreck site where the bite is on. Vesselview allows accessing and monitoring of all your boat’s systems as well as being able to set the cruise control. And finally there is Auto Heading, which links its electronic compass onto the boat’s heading, keeping it on course with a one degree adjustments available from the joystick and 10 degree tuning from the control panel.

One bit of redundancy that is built into the system covers a rather familiar scenario and one that none of us want to deal with while away from the dock. Given the amount of electronics we have become used to using all the time—chartplotter, radar, sounder, radio, entertainment center, baitwell pump, lights and lots of other electric gear—a situation might arise where there is a depletion of your cranking batteries’ power. If the Mercury system identifies this is happening, it will automatically raise the idle rate of the engines and bring the charge current up. Other features include one power steering pump and one steering cylinder per engine just in case there is a problem with any other engine. There is also a guardian mode that will kick in so as not allow the engine to operate outside of accepted parameters. And there are anti-collision cables between all multiple engine applications.

Mercury Marine’s R&D was as focused and determined with this technology as it has been in the past when bringing other new advances forward. “We’ve had multiple validation cycles and tests, punishing the product way before bringing it to the consumer level,” Chapman said. With everything I’ve seen and experienced, the company has done its homework. The result is a user-friendly system that brings a new level of comfort to the outboard sector and one that just might get those on the fence about handling a boat down off it and onto the deck and at the helm. Mercury Marine. (920) 929-5892. http://www.mercurymarine.com 

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2013 in Equipment

 

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Yacht Spotting and New Launches

Yacht Spotting and New Launches

NORDHAVN 120

After the much-heralded, and well-deserved fanfare, Hull #1, christened Aurora, begins her journeys by setting out on a crossing from Hong Kong to Vancouver, Canada.

By Capt. Ken Kreisler

When last we checked in with Nordhavn, builder of the kind of cruising yachts that are designed to travel oceans, it had completed comprehensive and exhaustive tank testing on a 120-footer, its largest build to date. The massive yacht culminates five years of concept and construction by Pacific Asian Enterprises. Its VP, Jim Leishman, served as captain along with co-captain brother Jeff, the company’s chief of design on the shakedown trip. Also along were engineers from the factory.

openThe company has come a long way since its inception in 1973 in Dana Point, California, beginning first as a dealership and then, a year later, evolving into a small brokerage. In the first years, the business was comprised of general yacht brokerage and the importation of the venerable CT boats from Taiwan. In 1976, the now PAE began importing another line of boats from Taiwan called the Transpac 49. Over an eight-year period, the company imported, sold and delivered 35 Transpacs.

By 1977, a trend had emerged that saw two classes of boats coming out of Taiwan. The better boats were being provided by the yacht developers whose talent, skills and fortitude would enable them to control a yacht from conception to design, marketing, sales and service. The developer would own the all-important molds and tooling while the Taiwan builder would act as a sub-contractor and builder only to the yacht developer. This allowed the developer to set and control the specifications, quality, pricing and marketing program.

In 1978, Jeff Leishman, Jim’s younger brother, joined PAE’s sailboat business as a part-time employee. Still in high school, Jeff helped with new boat commissioning, deliveries and with the occasional drawing and sketch needed for the factory. Jeff’s natural talent for drawing and drafting was already apparent and was further developed in his high school and college drafting and design courses.

A Nordhavn 46, just like the one that started it all.

A Nordhavn 46, just like the one that started it all.

By 1988, the demographics were changing away from the cruising sailboat market and towards powerboats. As baby boomers were aging, they were becoming intolerant of the rigors of sailing, and PAE was thinking about importing powerboats and was even considering becoming a dealer for the products of others. It was then a discussion was undertaken to introduce Jeff’s school design, a 46-foot long-range cruiser as PAE’s next project, and soon Jim became convinced that building the powerboat was the right decision.

Since PAE was founded, nearly 850 new boats have been delivered, and about twice as many brokerage boats to customers of all ranges of experience, age, background and nationality.  And now, the Nordhavn 120.

Aurora begins her world travels by setting out for Vancouver, Canada from Hong Kong waters.

Aurora begins her world travels by setting out for Vancouver, Canada from Hong Kong waters.

She comes equipped with an impressive ships complement of outstanding features including a full-displacement hull for efficiency and seakindliness, standard bulbous bow, solid fiberglass bottom with a network of full-length, longitudinal and transverse stringers, a custom designed and engineered electrical system to suit all the boat’s requirements, hydraulic power for the windlass, bow and stern thrusters, active fin stabilizers and high-capacity bilge pump operations, as well as a host of redundant and safety items that any serious long-range passage making vessel must  have.

Her specifications are as follows:

LOA: 120’7″/36.75m
LWL: 108’4″/33.02m
BEAM: 27’11″/8.51m
DRAFT: 9’0″/2.74m (full load)
DISPLACEMENT: 848,994 lbs./385.07 LT (full load)
FUEL: 17,500 gal./66,244.7L
WATER: 2,8000 gal./10,599.2L
POWER: 2 x 965-hp MTU Series 2000/M72

All things are possible with Nordhavn's custom craftsmanship as typified by the main salon.

All things are possible with Nordhavn’s custom craftsmanship as typified in the main salon.

Aurora's well-equipped galley care easily take care of all dining requirements no matter how long her travels take her owners and their guests.

Aurora‘s well-equipped galley can easily take care of all dining requirements no matter how far and wide her travels take her owners, family and friends.

Working closely with the owners, Nordhavn delivered just what they wanted in the master stateroom.

Working closely with the owners, Nordhavn delivered just what they wanted in the master stateroom.

A view from the top takes on a new meaning from Aurora's pilothouse.

A view from the top takes on a new meaning from Aurora‘s pilothouse.

Aurora arrived in Vancouver on August 30, 2013, 44 days after setting out from Hong Kong and making a stop in the Aleutian Islands. And this is just the beginning.

Nordhavn-120-Yacht-Aurora

http://www.nordhavn.com

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2013 in Yacht Spotting And New Launches

 

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Yacht Spotting and New Launches

Yacht Spotting and New Launches

Kadey-Krogen Yachts Splashes Twentieth Krogen 58′

Embarks on enhanced offering of semi-custom designs

For those of you whose nautical directions lean towards cruising here, there, and well, wherever, Kadey-Krogen, 36 years and 600+ builds later, is providing you with the ability to set off on yet another quest.

All customers have individual needs, and in keeping with the goal of continuing to be one of the most customer-responsive companies in yacht building, Kadey-Krogen Yachts announces the splash of a very singular Krogen 58′. The new trawler yacht, Destiny, is complete with a wish list of custom and semi-custom features to accommodate her owners who have extensive sailing, fishing and diving experience and who plan to cruise the Mediterranean this summer.

Destiny, Hull #20 is offloaded and delivered to her proud new owners.

Kadey-Krogen 58′ Destiny offloads in Port Everglades, Florida. She is Hull # 20 for this model of semi-custom Kadey-Krogen trawler yachts.

Thanks to the prototypical livability of the interior and the superior capability and efficiency of the exclusive Pure Full Displacement (PFDTM) hull design, the handsome raised pilothouse design of the Krogen 58′ has become a real favorite especially among experienced yachtsmen. From the beginning, the Krogen 58′ has been available with many choices in special features–single or twin engines, and multiple stateroom and office arrangements–but the twentieth Krogen 58′, Destiny, brings a new level of one-to-one collaboration with customers to bring a dreamboat to fruition.

The interior of Hull #4's interior shows off Kadey-Krogen's ability to deliver a comfortable living space.

The interior of Hull #4’s interior shows off Kadey-Krogen’s ability to deliver a comfortable living space.

Destiny is a three-stateroom arrangement with a queen master forward, a VIP queen

Hull #3 sports a tender on the top deck.

Hull #3 sports a tender on the top deck.

guest quarters to starboard, and a den/office/cabin arrangement to port. Among the special features aboard Destiny are a custom swim/fishing platform, livewell and extra freezers to accommodate the owners’ fishing interests, underwater lights adding ambiance for al fresco dining on the back porch, as well as plenty of extra fuel storage for the tender for more exploration off the beaten path. The vessel’s professional quality galley also has a customer-specific appointment. Up top, the radar arch is integrated with the hardtop that supports a mast containing dual radars and FLIR, adding to her all-weather capability. Universal power converters and a gangway complete the “go anywhere” features.

As will Destiny, Hull #2 is underway for ports on and off the beaten path.

As will Destiny, Hull #2 is underway for ports on and off the beaten path.

This new Krogen 58′ with all of her special features will be on display both at Kadey-Krogen’s Stuart Open House January 24-25, 2014, in Stuart, FL, and at the Yacht and Brokerage Show in Miami Beach, FL, Feb. 13-17, 2014 and you can make an appointment to see Destiny for yourself. http://www.kadeykrogen.com

Kadey-Krogen Yachts currently builds trawler yachts from 39 to 68 feet.  The company’s headquarters is located in Stuart, FL, with additional sales offices in Annapolis, MD, and Seattle, WA.

                                                                          

 
 
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Posted by on December 10, 2013 in Yacht Spotting And New Launches

 

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Sea Trials

DSC_1255                 Bertram 540

Preference for Excellence
By Capt. Ken Kreisler
 Bertram-540-Motoyacht
The Bertram 540 runs on a well-earned, offshore heritage.

Although many quotes could describe the Bertram 540 Convertible, one rings particularly true: “Excellence is an art won by training and habituation.” Aristotle said that more than 2,000 years ago, unwittingly — and perfectly — describing the evolution of the iconic Bertram 540.

One merely has to look at the history of the brand to realize the importance of the company, not only in the development and refinement of sport-fishing boats, but in the continued advancement of the design as well.

From its self-confident beginnings in the early 1960s, when that first 31-foot Bertram pushed itself to the forefront of the boating community’s awareness with a record-setting run and win in the Miami-to-Nassau race, to its present brand-spanking-new Merritt Island facility, Bertram Yacht has learned and refined the art and skill of boatbuilding by continually paying attention to what it does best.

The 540 takes its pedigree from the decades its predecessors have spent on the sport-fishing circuit, with many of the lessons and designs learned while dealing with unpleasant conditions. Tournament anglers fish when they have to.

Her lines, courtesy of the collaborative effort between Bertram and Zuccon International, are in perfect proportion to her length and 17-foot beam. The soft sheer easily carries the elegant look of the boat’s profile from her pulpit to the transom. And your eye has no trouble following the curve of her black mask back to those oversize side windows and then up as her tower rises above the 160-square-foot cockpit.

Interior

bertram-540-3

Bright and wide open spaces typify her interior.

Things can change once you get on board the 540. That’s because the boat can be configured in just about any way its owner may want her. For example, my test 540 had a fairly traditional interior layout, with a couch to port, a large flat-screen TV in the aft starboard corner, the galley forward and to starboard, and a dinette area opposite.

In another arrangement, the galley location is swapped with the seating area. To add an extra layer of innovation to this option, Bertram installed a large, electrically operated aft bulkhead window that replaces the usual fixed one. This gives the owner the ability to open up that salon space to those seated on the cockpit mezzanine. There was even a request for a portside galley down layout, as this prospective owner did not need the stateroom on that side.

bertram-540-4As far as living accommodations go, the 540 offers a three-stateroom, two-head boat with a forepeak master to starboard and a twin cabin to port. (The twin and forepeak share the second head.) I found the quarters roomy and comfortable with ample storage areas and pleasing decor throughout.

Cockpit

Rigged, ready, and underway.

Rigged, ready, and underway.

Of course, being a Bertram, the 540’s business end is exactly what one would expect aboard a competitive sport-fishing boat. With the aforementioned 160 square feet of working space, you could put together the best fishing amenities to suit your needs, including the requisite top-of-the-line chair or a stylish leaning post. You could outfit the boat with an array of rocket launchers or in-gunwale rod holders, and there is comfortable mezzanine seating and a host of in-sole boxes, a large transom door and gate, freezers, ice makers, coaming padding and a long list of optional equipment. Want to dress things up a bit? Try the teak coaming and opt to have the exotic wood put down on the deck as well.

Engine Room

Engine room space is well laid out with all critical maintenance areas within easy reach.

Engine room space is well laid out with all critical maintenance areas within easy reach.

The engine room boasted a pair of optional 1,676 hp CAT C32s — twin 1,224 MAN V-12s are standard, with 1,360 MAN V-12s being yet another available engine option. A pair of 15.5-kw Cummins-Onan gensets (one is standard, and there’s the option to upgrade to 23-kw) also live down below. You can easily access the engine room through a cockpit door, and you get two hands on anything that needs servicing. In addition, Bertram allocates added space for watermakers and an anti-roll gyro system.

Flybridge
Topside, the bridge is first class, with plenty of storage space, a forward centerline cooler and lots of comfortable seating. The expansive electronics console accommodates as many high-tech navigational instruments as you could want. Options include helm and companion seats finished off in high-gloss teak and a handy table forward of the helm.

bertram-540-5

A luxurious sportfishing machine, the 540 is also a formidable predator while in pursuit of big fish in offshore waters.

Performance
Out on the water, the 540 is a spirited performer. While she posted a wide-open

The 540 struts her stuff.

The 540 struts her stuff.

throttle speed of 40.5 knots, at 2,200 rpm she clipped right along at a comfortable 37 knots. And just as impressive is her 31-knot turn of speed at 1,800 rpm. Of particular note is the way she answered the helm with almost instantaneous response to either port or starboard turns. Whether hard-over maneuvering or countering through S-curves, she came right back to straight and true tracking. And while my test day saw flat-calm conditions, I did manage to find a rather large vessel throwing a more than substantial wake, and, making a beeline for it, I put her right into it, noting the way she shouldered through with no slamming or pounding.

bertram-540-6

Construction
The 540 is built with all the attention to detail and quality that the Bertram brand is known for. And now, with the new facility at Merritt Island, the company will be infusing all of its boats, switching over from the traditional hand-laid, open-molding lamination process.

“The plan with all new production is to infuse the laminate and the main longitudinal stringer system in the initial process, as well as all major parts, including the superstructure,” says Ken Beauregard, Bertram’s vice president of manufacturing. Including the stringers in the first shot of the process has a couple of advantages; chief among them is that it results in a much stronger structure than that used in a secondary bonding method, where preparation and grinding is necessary. In addition, and across the board on all of its boats, Bertram will also be tying in all of the cabinetry with fiberglass during the assembly process, creating as solid a total structure as possible, especially when operating in less than suitable sea conditions.

Direction

“In this business, it has to be a team effort. From our quality inspector through the engineering staff to our human resources folks, whoever is involved in that end product and beyond, it has to be first class,” says Alton Herndon, who took the helm of Bertram Yacht in March 2010.

Herndon, a well-known industry veteran, has seen significant time at Hatteras, Palmer Johnson, Tiara and KCS International. Additionally, before coming aboard at Bertram, he was the co-founder and managing partner of Southport Boat Works, and he has made a habit of seeking excellence.

Robt. Ullberg

Robert Ullberg, VP of Engineering and Product Development, has his nautical expertise right on course with Bertram.

The 540’s place in the Bertram convertible hierarchy is an important one. Its owner-friendly length, its ability to be as custom as custom can get, and its inherent versatility as a highly competitive fishing platform that also provides onboard comfort ensure that it will continue to set a high standard in its size class.

“We’re focused on going in a certain direction. Getting Robert Ullberg in here as our vice president of engineering and product development means that new designs will be coming along; and they will still come with all the great things that everyone expects from owning a Bertram,” Herndon says, with a knowing smile and a twinkle in his eye. “It gives all of us here at the company a great deal of satisfaction to do what we do, and to do it well.”

This brings us full circle to another fitting thought from Aristotle: “Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.”

Fuel consumption is based on (2) engines at any given RPM. Speed and ranges, if any, are estimates based on engineering calculations. Range is based on 90% fuel capacity. Actual performance will vary and be affected by water and weather conditions, load and conditions of boat, engines, and propellers. Speed will increase as fuel is consumed. All data is illustrative and not warranted.

 
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Posted by on December 10, 2013 in Sea Trials

 

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